FAQs

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Q?

How soon can I see a physical therapist for my first appointment?

A.

Within 24 hours of you calling us, we will see you for your initial consultation appointment. 

Q?

I want to learn more about my injury. Do you have any information I can access to find out whether or not physical therapy will help me?

A.

Please email us your question and one of our physical therapists will answer you. A physical therapy consultation or evaluation, however, is the most accurate means of diagnosing an injury and prescribing the most effective treatment. 

Q?

What else do I need to know about receiving physical therapy?

A.

Just this: to a large extent, the speed and quality of your recovery depends on you! You are a partner in the treatment plan formed by your therapist and your physician. With hard work and perseverance, you will achieve the best possible outcome. 

Q?

What if I have to cancel an appointment?

A.

Simply call the office where the appointment is scheduled and notify the receptionist. Please try to give us 12 hours notice, and preferably 24 hours, so that someone else can use your appointment time. 

Q?

 Should I seek therapy before/after orthopedic surgery?

A.

We have found that pre-surgical therapy promotes and fosters a more effective and rapid recovery. After surgery, our physical therapists are experts at expediting healing and return to activity. They can also prevent secondary dysfunction, which is common due to compensatory movements and postures that occur due to pain and swelling. It is also comforting for you to have access to an experienced medical professional to ask your questions and concerns regarding your recovery as they arise. 

Q?

Why should I see a physical therapist rather than self-treat?

A.

A common mistake made when self-treating is to treat the symptom rather than the cause. This can lead to short-term benefits, rapid symptom recurrence and the possibility of a chronic pain cycle. Pain is a symptom, not the cause of the problem, therefore knowing where you hurt is not as useful as knowing what is at the source of the problem. Often times, the cause of symptoms may be remote from the location of pain or related to postural or movement dysfunctions, commonly known as a "compensation" or "substitution." A physical therapist can help you find the cause (or root) of your problem based on factual evidence. Then, a plan is made to promote healing and prevent secondary dysfunction from occurring. The plan is then clearly communicated to you, ultimately enabling you to self-treat more effectively. 

Q?

What insurances do you accept?

A.

We accept numerous insurances.  Liens may be covered on a case by case basis. If you have been injured in a car accident, you may be eligible for coverage under your PPO or car insurance policy. If you find that we are not listed in your provider handbook, please contact us anyway. We will be happy to verify your eligibility.  For more information, click here. We also accept cash for treatments. 

Q?

What office policies should I be aware of?

A.

It’s important to know that Integrated Physical Therapy Services, Inc. frowns on clients who fail to show up for an appointment without calling ahead. If you are late to an appointment, it might not be possible for you to have your full session time because other patients may be scheduled before and after you.  

Q?

Is it okay to ask my doctor about physical therapy?

A.

If you have an injury that you think may benefit from therapy, we encourage you to ask your doctor about it. Physical therapy is a great way to manage painful orthopedic conditions in conjunction with other treatments your doctor recommends. 

Q?

How do I contact you?

A.

We can be contacted in several ways: by e-mail, snail mail, fax or telephone. Go to our contact us page for the details, including a map and directions. 

Q?

How much will it cost?

A.

Cost is based on the type and duration of treatment intervention. Talk to your therapist about your individual cost. Because there are many different insurance plans, it is your responsibily to understand your personal plan. As a courtesy, we call your insurance company to check your benefits. You are responsible for any co-pays, deductibles, and percentages left over that insurance may not cover. We also treat patients involved in personal injury cases and accept workers' compensation patients. 

Q?

Am I going to be in pain?

A.

While the goal of therapy is to decrease pain and optimize function, there may be some discomfort involved, especially in the beginning. Your therapist will plan each treatment session around your symptoms. If you're feeling pain or have decreased pain, please tell the therapist. 

Q?

My doctor gave me a prescription for physical therapy and recommended a certain clinic. The name of the clinic is on the prescription. Do I have to go there?

A.

No. Just as you have your choice in physicians and pharmacists, you have your choice in physical therapists. Be advised that some physicians have a financial interest in certain clinics and that may be why they specify a particular clinic. Your physician is obligated to disclose this information to you. You can go anywhere you choose — just be aware of your insurance plan, as some plans have different benefits for different providers. 

Q?

How will I handle my problem at home?

A.

Your therapy program includes a home program to be carried out independently. Our physical therapists use patient-related instruction to educate the patient, families and other care givers about the patient's current condition, treatment plan and future transition to home, work or community roles. 

Q?

What is a physical therapist assistant?

A.

Physical therapist assistants, or PTAs, are skilled health care providers who work under the supervision of physical therapists. Duties of the PTA include assisting the physical therapist in implementing treatment programs, training patients in exercises and activities of daily living, conducting treatments and reporting to the physical therapist on the patient's responses. In addition to direct patient care, the physical therapist assistant may also perform such functions as patient transport and clinic or equipment preparation and maintenance. 

Q?

How many times a week and for how many weeks will I have to come?

A.

Frequency and duration of treatment is initially recommended by your medical physician. After the initial evaluation, the therapist determines proper intervention frequency.  Typical frequency is 2-3 times per week. 

Q?

In addition to the evaluation, what else is involved in my treatment?

A.

Physical therapists may use one or a combination of the following interventions to achieve treatment goals:

  • Therapeutic exercises (including aerobic conditioning and functional exercises)
  • Functional training in self care and home management
  • Manual therapy techniques (soft tissue and joint mobilization)
  • Physical agents, mechanical and/or thermal modalities
  • Electrotherapeutic modalities
  • Educational and/or application of assistive, adaptive and protective devices and equipment 

Q?

What are your hours of operation?

A.

Appointments can be scheduled from any of our physical therapy clinics. Hours vary per clinic site. Click here for hours of operation, locations and phone numbers. Hours of operation are subject to change. 

Q?

Will my insurance pay for treatment? What would I have to pay each visit?

A.

Most insurance plans cover outpatient therapy. Usually, there is a deductible and/or a co-payment for each visit.  We collect co-payments at the time of your visit, or they can be billed to you. 

Q?

Do I need to be referred by my doctor?

A.

All treatment, except for our wellness programs, requires a physician referral to ensure insurance payment. Ohio is a direct access state which means you may be seen by a physical therapist without a physician's referral. Under special circumstances, you may receive consultation services or treatment intervention without physician referral. 

Q?

What information do I need to bring with me to my first visit?

A.

On your initial visit, please bring doctor's orders for therapy, any applicable insurance information, referrals or referral numbers, your insurance card and any other appropriate billing information.  Also, you bring any operative reports, diagnostic tests (x-rays, MRI, etc.) or protocols your physician has given you. 

Q?

What should I wear?

A.

Please wear loose-fitting, comfortable clothing to all sessions. You may want to wear or bring shorts if we are treating an ankle, hip or knee.  We offer a changing / locker room if you need to change your attire. 

Q?

How long is each visit?

A.

The first visit and initial evaluation takes approximately one hour. Each follow-up visit takes about 30 to 60 minutes, but may take longer depending on your condition and the program established for you. 

Q?

What should I expect during my initial visit?

A.

To initiate a program of therapy, the physical therapist examines the client. This includes obtaining a patient history, performing relevant systems reviews, and selecting and administering specific tests and measurements to obtain data. Following the assessment, you will receive a detailed explanation of your condition and how it will be managed.